Why Human Dog Training?


What Human Dog Training Is Not

HUMILIATION
Many Leathermen have the idea that dog training always means humiliation. We disagree. For many, perhaps most, human dogs and their Handlers, dog training is not a humiliating experience, but rather an enjoyable, relaxing, and empowering one.
That having been said, for some people human dog play can be an adventure in humiliation sought after by both parties. It can run the gamut from companion and friend to sub-human object. Make it what you want it to be.


What’s in it For the Handler

What’s in it for the Handler varies from person to person in the scene. For some, it is the incredible mix Of dominance and companionship that comes with owning and training a human dog. There is nothing quite like coming home from work and finding a human pup wagging on the front porch to greet you, or the simple pleasure Of watching television with your human pup’s head in your lap as you scratch his head and allow the stresses of the day to just melt away. Having a human who is both your companion and your pet, your protector and your submissive, your friend and your property is an experience relished by many Tops, Handlers, and Dominants.


What’s in it For the Human Pup

What is the best way to find out what pups get out of Human Pup Play? Finding out from them directly!

Robert:
I get an escape from the stress and expectations of my human work and human life. I get to enjoy life in its most basic form for a while.

Strapps:
My hood helps me when I’m feeling introverted. .i can be quite extroverted as a bear but STRAPPS helps me complete my personality…but recently my other hood has allowed me to expand my sexuality.

King:
Personal answers into the how and why of pup play, might hinder others more than they help. All personal journeys are just that, “personal”, they are a formula made up of a lifetime of positive and negative experiences. Trying to reduce that to the simplistic “I get this out of being a pup” is akin to not reading a novel but knowing in the end ‘the hero died cos he was greedy”..

Folf:
I’m only just getting started in exploring pup play but for me at least it’s a bit like meditation. Getting to relax into a state where I’m free to express myself and just do things because they seem fun or interesting at the time while ignoring the voices that tell me how silly it may be.
For me, I see dogs as some of the happiest creatures on the planet and I just want to try and get into the same headspace that’ll allow me to be that carefree and happy as well.

Tiger:
so I’m trying to think of how to put this and i’m struggling to put it together, so i wrote a bit of a thing i guess haha (and yeah, it sounds hella pretentious so i’m like wicked sorry eheh ^^”)

because i’m not a traditional puppy, i’ve wondered if what i get out of this is what others get out of it, and i’ve worked out that there are a couple of different ways that this all ties together.
Primarily, because of the nature of how i guess the whole “werewolf puppy” thing works for me, i guess it’s important to note that i can’t distinctly separate the kid side of me from the wuffy pup side of me. they’re the same me, just with a different outward appearance.
The wuff part of my nature, though, definitely gives me more primal behaviours, and lets me feel free to challenge things and push boundaries that people in a more conventional age play or puppy play setting might not push.
I mean, yeah there are the traditional elements like being curious and exploratory, being somewhat naive, and being ridiculously affectionate…but then there is this side that likes to test and push, coming out when i’m in wuffy mode as either play (which can look like mock-hunting, challenging, growling, biting, etc.) or defensive aggression if lines get crossed. analogous behaviours exist for when im in kid mode, and although a lot of people think it’s a kind of “oh, look at the brat who wants to be shown their place” situation, that isn’t really the case (i just don’t have the vocab tonight to explain *what* the situation is…i guess i can use the words “i am not a submissive werewolf” but that just comes across as arrogant and i don’t wanna do that…)

i guess ultimately, together, the kid and the wuff are just who i am…they’re the way of expressing myself that most feels natural…so my form of puppy play gives me the ability and freedom to actually be myself, rather than the “pretend adult” (as one of my friends calls it) that i sometimes otherwise have to be

i have a lot of trouble explaining the puppy side of me in terms that are separate from the kid side, because they aren’t distinct things
like, the kid side has a lot of behaviours that are very puppyish, and the puppy side has a lot of thought processes that are more human…
as a kid i growl and have been known to nip at people and i challenge and stuff

Gpup:
For something as simple as “pretending to be a dog” the leaps and bounds I have grown are huge.

I’ve learned to trust. Trust in my master & handler, trust in my pup brothers and most importantly in myself. I feel safe, nurtured and yes even owned. I feel safe with my pack, I know I can express my animal side without worry of “human” repercussions. Living in a world of day to day “consequences” taking time for human pup play has opened the door to a peaceful paradise of dog and handler, training and animal headspace, of joy without regrets.

I’ve learned to view my world though a different set of eyes. Eyes while sitting on all fours encased in leather or rubber gear, eyes that encompass my canine soul, my masters pet. A soul that is simple without the complexity of human form. A world of my owner to whom I am collared, playing, caring, supporting. While part of my dog like drives are base, in reality it’s the mateship, the companionship, the animal trust and connection that brings me such joy.

I have to admit that human pup play has pushed my boundaries. I’ve explored in ways I never imagined. My mate, my companion, my handler has taught me well. I now know how I stand, especially when on all fours. I can woof, bark and howl to express my inner dog soul. I can sleep knowing my pack has my back. I can give and take when playing as I learn a new human pup behaviour.

I’ve learned honor, care, trust. For this I am grateful.


The Animal Core

Geoff Mains captured the essence Of leathersex and, in many regards, the essence Of human dog play, when he wrote the passage below almost two decades ago.

Leather begins with a litany of don’ts, creating from them a poetry of meaningful experience.

We are taught that the asshole is dirty and despicable. Leather explores and builds on its forbidden sensations
that are closely tied with those of sexual arousement.

We are taught that urine is to be shunned and that the natural tendency Of children to play piss games are unclean. Leather uses the expression of pissing along with its overtones of territory, dominance and sexuality to
cement bonds on a level that is basic and animal.

Leather could be termed the art or culture Of the forbidden. This art has its beginnings in a very animal core that lies within all of us. That core is at its heart instinctive and addictive both strongly animal and distinctly human.

There is something at the core of Handlers and human dogs that is both strongly animal and distinctively human, and through human dog role playing, that core can be tapped and its strength released.

Many of the rituals, and the draw, of leathersex, BDSM, and animal role playing are deeply spiritual, and allow players to tap the animal soul, the core that exists within every human but which has, for centuries, been repressed. Countless authors in the leather and BDSM communities have addressed this issue far better and far beyond the scope of this book. The authors within Urban Aboriginal and Leather Folk have performed an all-important service to the leather, BDSM, and human animal training communities with their insights and research.

Mythographers, anthropologists, and theologians have also addressed the aspects of the animal within. As societies have changed over the centuries, the animal aspect of the human soul has been repressed, and human animal play is a way to re-awaken this primal feeling and need.